Intern
    Lehrstuhl für Psychologie III

    Dr. Barbara Händel

    barbara.haendel@uni-wuerzburg.de

    Room 303

    Department of Psychology (III)

    Röntgenring 11

    97070 Würzburg, Germany

    phone: +49 931 31-84194

    fax: +49 931 31-82815

     

    Research interests

    Brain and Body Rhythms:

    How do body movements influence perception? We want to shed light on this question by directly relating rhythmic body movements to percept measured behaviorally as well as percept related cortical activity.

    My group uses human non-invasive recordings from electro- and magnetoencephalography (EEG, MEG) as well as invasive human (ECoG) and animal multi-electrode recordings to investigate the relationship between movements and perception. Considering the role of oscillatory brain activity in perception, one focus lies on neuronal oscillations.

    This work is supported by the ERC starting grant “BBRhythms” (677819) .

     Oscillatory brain activity and perception

    Oscillatory activity of various frequencies has been shown to be related to perceptual processes.

    In order to disentangle perceptual processes from the tightly correlated processing of the sensory input we investigate:

    Perception during the modulation of

    Attention

    Percept decoupled from sensory input through

    Visual illusions, Synaesthesia

    Cerebellum

    One main role of the cerebellum is supporting motor functions. At the same time, visual motion processing in cerebral cortex critically depends on an intact cerebellum. Motor output like walking will introduce a change of retinal input (visual motion) due to self-motion. Investigating cerebellar activity might be a link to understand the influence of body movements on perception.

    High frequency components measured with microelectrodes, ECoG and MEG

    How much mutual information can be found in the signal measured by different invasive and non-invasive recording techniques?

    Händel, B., Womelsdorf, T.,  Bosman, C., & Fries P. (2014). Exploring 200-1000 Hz field potentials with microelectrodes, ecog and meg. Soc Neurosci Abstr 11584.

    Choice certainty

    Zizlsperger L., Sauvigny T., Händel B., & Haarmeier T. (2014). Cortical representations of confidence in a visual perceptual decision. Nature communications, 5:3940.

     

    Publications

    Publications in peer reviewed journals

    Händel B., & Jensen, O. (2014). Spontaneous local alpha oscillations predict motion-induced blindness. European Journal of Neuroscience, 40 (9), 3371-3379. pdf.

    Zizlsperger L., Sauvigny T., Händel, B., & Haarmeier T. (2014). Cortical representations of confidence in a visual perceptual decision. Nature communications, 5:3940. pdf.

    van Leeuwen TM., Hagoort P., & Händel, B. (2013) Real color captures attention and overrides spatial cues in grapheme-color synesthetes but not in controls. Neuropsychologia, 51 (10), 1802-1813. pdf.

    Händel, B., Haarmeier, T., & Jensen, O. (2011). Alpha Oscillations Correlate with the Successful Inhibition of Unattended Stimuli. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 23(9), 2494–2502. pdf.

    Haegens, S., Händel, B., & Jensen, O. (2011). Top-Down Controlled Alpha Band Activity in Somatosensory Areas Determines Behavioral Performance in a Discrimination Task, The Journal of Neuroscience, 31(14):5197–5204. pdf.

    Händel, B., Thier, P., & Haarmeier T. (2009). Visual Motion Perception Deficits Due to Cerebellar Lesions Are Paralleled by Specific Changes in Cerebro-Cortical Activity. The Journal of Neuroscience, 29 (48): 15126 –33. pdf.

    Händel, B., & Haarmeier, T. (2009). Cross- frequency coupling of brain oscillations indicates the success in visual motion discrimination. Neuroimage, 45: 1040–1046. pdf.

    Händel, B., Lutzenberger W., Thier P., & Haarmeier T. (2008). Selective Attention Increases the Dependency of Cortical Responses on Visual Motion Coherence in Man. Cerebral Cortex, 18: 2902-2908. pdf.

    Händel, B., Lutzenberger W., Thier P., & Haarmeier T. (2007). Opposite dependencies on visual motion coherence in human area MT+ and early visual cortex. Cererbal Cortex, 17(7):1542-9. pdf.

    Tikhonov, A.*, Händel, B.*, Haarmeier T., Lutzenberger, W., & Thier, P. (2007). Gamma oscillations underlying the visual motion after-effect. Neuroimage, 38: 708-719. pdf.

    Røskaft, E., Händel, B., Bjerke, T., & Kaltenborn, BP. (2007). Human attitudes towards large carnivores in Norway. Wildlife Biology, 13: 172-185. pdf.

    * shared first authorship

    Invited Talks and Symposia:

    B. Händel (2016) How oscillatory brain activity helps to understand perception, Neurobiologisches Montagscolloquium, Universität Tübingen, Vortrag

    B. Händel (2014) Exploring >200 Hz field potentials with microelectrodes, ECoG and MEG, Max-Planck retreat, Ringberg, Vortrag

    B. Händel (2013) How an idling rhythm grew to shape our perception.  Workshop: “Alpha: from Mechanism to Cognition” am Ernst Strüngmann Institute (ESI) for Neuroscience, Vortrag

    B. Händel (2010) Oscillatory Brain Activity: From Raw Data to Group Averages Using Beamformer Approaches. Human Brain Mapping (HBM), Barcelona (Spanien), Vortrag

    O. Jensen, B. Händel (2010). Shaping functional architecture by oscillatory alpha activity. Federation of European Neuroscience Societies (FENS), Amsterdam (Niederlande), Symposium

    B. Händel (2010) Cross - frequency coupling of brain oscillations. BIOMAG – 17th international Conference on Biomagnetism, Dubrovnik (Kroatien), Symposium/ Vortrag

    B. Händel (2010) From real to illusionary - how oscillations can predict perception. Universität Leipzig, Vortrag

    B. Händel (2010) Modulation of broadband high frequency oscillations in human MEG activity, BIC, Universität Frankfurt

    B. Händel (2010) Cross-frequency coupling, New York University (USA), Vortrag

    B. Händel (2010) From real to illusionary - how oscillations can predict perception, University Maastricht (Niederlande), Vortrag

    B. Händel (2009) Cross - frequency coupling of brain oscillations in the neocortex. Brain Waves, Lorentz Center, Leiden (Niederlande), Vortrag

    B. Händel, O. Jensen (2009) Human Alpha Band Activity Reflects Resource Allocation by Disengaging Task-Irrelevant Areas. Society for psychophysiological research meeting (SPR), Berlin, Vortrag

    B. Händel (2009) How oscillations can predict perceptual performance. Hertie Institute Tübingen, Vortrag

    B. Händel (2009) Can brain oscillation shed light on the mechanism of synesthesia?, F.C.Donders Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Nijmegen, Niederlande, Vortrag

    B. Händel (2009) How can attention improve perception? Signal detection vs. stochastic resonance, F.C.Donders Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Nijmegen (Niederlande), Vortrag

    B. Händel (2008) Conscious percept and unconscious attention? – MIB and its underlying brain oscillations, F.C.Donders Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Nijmegen (Niederlande), Vortrag

    B. Händel (2008) Functional correlates of the physical and perceptual properties of visual motion in humans, UCL - London (England), Vortrag

    B. Händel , T. Haarmeier (2005) Contributions of the cerebellum to visual motion perception, Hertie Institute Tübingen, Vortrag

    B. Händel , T. Haarmeier (2005) Attention can improve motion perception – yet how?, Uni-Klinik Tübingen, Vortrag

    Posters:

    B. Händel, P. Fries (2015) Power and frequency of human visually induced gamma-band activity reflects retinal but not perceived stimulus speed. Soc Neurosci Abstr 207.04.

    B. Händel, T. Womelsdorf, C. Bosman, P. Fries (2014) Exploring 200-1000 Hz field potentials with microelectrodes, ecog and meg. Soc Neurosci Abstr 11584.

    B. Händel, O. Jensen (2010) Brain oscillations predict illusory visual disappearance as observed in motion induced blindness. HBM

    B. F. Händel, T.M. van Leeuwen, O. Jensen, P. Hagoort (2010) Lateralization of alpha oscillations in grapheme-color synaesthetes suggests altered color processing. FENS

    B. Händel, T. Haarmeier, O. Jensen (2009) Prestimulus alpha power lateralization in visual cortex predicts performance in the unattended hemifield. Soc Neurosci Abstr 757.10.

    B. Haendel, P. Thier, T. Haarmeier, (2008) Cerebellar lesions induce changes in visual motion adaptation as measured by the visual motion aftereffect. Soc Neurosci Abstr 460.14.

    B. Händel, W. Lutzenberger, P. Thier, T. Haarmeier (2007) Attention modulates low frequency oscillations reflecting signal-to-noise characteristics in a visual motion discrimination task. In proceedings of the 10th Tübingen Perception Conference: H. Bülthoff, A. Chatziastros, H. Mallot and R. Ulrich (Ed.).

    S. Dash, B. F. Händel, W. Lutzenberger, P. Thier, T. Haarmeier, (2007) The amount of inter-frequency coupling between gamma and slow oscillations indicates performance in a visual motion discrimination task - a human MEG study. Soc Neurosci Abstr 715.29

    B. Händel, T. Haarmeier, (2006) Spatial Attention can increase the signal to noise ratio of MEG responses elicited by visual motion. 5th Forum of european neuroscience A216.9.

    B. Händel, W. Lutzenberger, P. Thier, T. Haarmeier, (2005) Functional correlates of visual motion discrimination deficits in patients with cerebellar damage. Soc Neurosci Abstr 619.7.

    A. Tikhonov, T. Haarmeier, W. Lutzenberger, B. Händel, P. Thier, (2004) Cerebellar gamma-band activity correlates with the size of the visual motion aftereffect. In proceedings of the 7th Tübingen Perception Conference: H. Bülthoff, H. Mallot, R. Ulrich and F. Wichman (Ed.).

    B. Händel, W. Lutzenberger, P. Thier, T. Haarmeier, (2004) Functional correlates of perceptual decision making in a visual motion discrimination task in man. Soc Neurosci Abstr 526.7.

    B. Händel, W. Lutzenberger, A. Tikhonov, P. Thier, T. Haarmeier, (2003) Neuromagnetic activity in humans correlates with visual motion coherence. Soc Neurosci Abstr 591.15.

    A. Tikhonov, T. Haarmeier, W. Lutzenberger, B. Händel, P. Thier, (2003) Gamma-band activity recorded from the cerebellum is correlated with the size of the visual motion aftereffect. Soc Neurosci Abstr 591.13.